Taps 2

This tap has one handle which can be only turned to the right. No buttons, no pressing, no pulling.  The problem with this tap is that you can't control the water jet and temperature separately. So there are three options only:
  • low pressure water jet and cold water,
  • middle pressure water jet and warm water,
  • high pressure water jet and hot water.


One could argue that it can't be used in a wrong way (it is installed in a public bathroom). But this tap would only make sense if the water pressure would be the same for all temperatures and not changing with the temperature.

Edit 24.5.2010: I found another example in an older building (the one above is located in a new modern glass-steel building). It has a nice arrow on a handle with "OFF" at the beginning of it and "HOT" at the end of it.  The handle moves only from left to right and back. And again, flow of the water is tight to the temperature (cold water low flow and hot water high flow).



How bad are web user interfaces realy?

It seams like the web usability is somehow forgotten by the big companies nowdays. Reading recent articles about how Facebook is hiding all privacy setting in different places preventing their users to lock up their accounts made me think if the web usability got buried by the profit. Who has the time (a precious resource) and will to manage their personal information privacy (information about a person stored on the web and looked after by someone else - Facebook in this example) if all possible privacy concerning settings are in such weird places? And we can't never be certain that we found all settings! Facebook has an advantage that their service (social networking) outweighs privacy concerns for so many people. How is that people just don't care that much about their own privacy?

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PS: If someone is interested, there's a book on web usability written by Nielsen


British taps 1

It happens to everyone when visiting a foreign country. Some things there just seem to be made or done in a weirdest possible way. I moved to the Queen's island and their taps amazed me and they keep going. My new hobby now is to take pictures of taps and sinks.

The first one in a series is "The divided tap" or separate tap. The sink has two taps: one for hot and another for cold water. And they are at least half a meter apart. At first I thought it was impossible to get a warm water of right temperature. But I was wrong.  You plug up the sink, then open both taps simultaneously and when you have the water of right temperature in the sink you wash yourself. I'd never come up with such an idea myself and have never thought of filling up the sink with water.

There is just no way of getting running warm water to rinse hands.

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